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Posts Tagged ‘Gram Parsons’

Died On This Date (August 13, 2013) Tompall Glaser / Country Music Great

Posted by themusicsover on August 13, 2013

Tompall Glaser
September 3, 1933 – August 13, 2013

tompall-glaserTompall Glaser was one of the original so-called “outlaws” of country music. Alongside the likes of Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, Johnny Cash, and Billy Joe Shaver, Glaser put Nashville on watch by working, living, and playing outside the mainstream country music rules of the ’70s.  Born in Spalding, Nebraska, Glaser initially moved to Nashville with his brothers to sing back up for Marty Robbins.  The brothers were also making their own records before Tompall went off on his own.  Over the course of his solo career, he released around a dozen albums that included hit country singles like “Put Another Log On The Fire” and “It’ll Be Her.”  Perhaps his most famous song however, “Streets Of Baltimore,” found its glory thanks to being covered by the likes of Gram Parsons, Bobby Bare, the Statler Brothers, Charley Pride, and Norah Jones‘ country group, the Little Willies.  Meanwhile, Glaser and his brothers opened Glaser Brothers Sound Studio, or as it was affectionately known around town, Hillbilly Central.  The compound quickly established itself as the fostering ground for the “outlaw” movement.  As it took hold, even RCA Records had to react by releasing Wanted! The Outlaws, a compilation of previously released tracks by Glaser, Nelson, Jennings, and Jessie Colter.  Glaser’s contribution, “T For Texas,” reached #36 on the Country Singles charts and is considered one of the milestones of the era.  The album itself, released in 1976, became the first Country album to sell over 1 million copies as it reached #1 on the Country Album charts and #10 on the Pop Album charts.  Glaser continued to record with his brothers until 1982 and released one last solo album in 1986 before selling the studio and retiring from the music business altogether.  Tompall Glaser died following a long undisclosed illness on August 13, 2013.  He was 79.

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Posted in Americana, Country, Musician, Singer, Songwriter | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Died On This Date (April 29, 2012) Jim McCrary / Rock Photographer

Posted by themusicsover on April 29, 2012

Jim McCrary
August 31, 1939 – April 29, 2012

© Jim McCrary / From jimmccrary.com

Jim McCrary was an award-winning photographer whose portfolio includes some of the most iconic rock album covers in history.  Born and raised in the Los Angeles area, McCrary was mostly self-taught by the time he enrolled in a college photography program.  In 1967, McCrary was hired by A&M Records where he was their chief photographer.  Over the next seven years, he took photographs that ended up on the covers of over 300 albums, many of which are some of the famous in rock history.  They include Carole King’s Tapestry, the Carpenters’ Now and Then, and Joe Cocker‘s Mad Dogs and Englishmen, to name just a few.  The list of other artists he captured lasting images of  includes Gram Parsons, Cat Stevens, Lee Michaels, Styx, and Billy Preston.  In 1974, McCrary opened his own studio in Hollywood where he worked for the better part of the next 20 years.  That was followed by a photography supply store.  Jim McCrary was 72 when he died of complications from a chronic nervous system disorder on April 29, 2012.

Thanks to Henk de Bruin at 2+ Printing for the assist.

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Died On This Date (April 23, 2012) Chris Ethridge / International Submarine Band; Flying Burrito Brothers

Posted by themusicsover on April 23, 2012

Chris Ethridge
1947 – April 23, 2012

Chris Ethridge was an American musician who is best remembered for playing in the International Submarine Band and the Flying Burrito Brothers.  Born in Meridian, Mississippi, Ethridge was already playing in local bands by the time he moved to Los Angeles at 17.  It was there that he joined the International Submarine Band, playing alongside with Gram Parsons.  The year was 1967, and Ethridge played on that year’s release, Safe At Home.  Parsons left ISB the following year and Ethridge followed suit.  He worked with Parsons on solo projects even co-writing several of his songs.  In 1968, Ethridge co-founded the Flying Burrito Brothers with Parsons, Chris Hillman, and Sneaky Pete Kleinow. Although Ethridge played on just the band’s first album, The Gilded Palace Of Sin before leaving in 1969, it can’t be denied that he played a role in the birth of country rock while influencing the likes of the Eagles, Wilco, and Ryan Adams.  In 1975, he participated in a reformed version of the Burrito Brothers for the recording of Flying Again.  Over the course of his career, Ethridge played on records by such acts as Linda Ronstadt, Jackson Browne, Randy Newman, and Ry Cooder.  He also spent more than seven years playing in Willie Nelson’s live band. Chris Ethridge was 65 when he passed away on April 23, 2012. He was 65.  Cause of death was not immediately released.

Thanks to Bruce Kilgour at Slipped Disc Entertainment for the assist.

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The Gilded Palace of Sin and Burrito Deluxe - The Flying Burrito Brothers

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Died On This Date (April 19, 2011) Jim Dickson / Managed The Byrds

Posted by themusicsover on April 19, 2011

Jim Dickson
DOB Unknown – April 19, 2011

Jim Dickson was a recording engineer, producer,  and eventual manager of the Byrds.  He is often cited as one of the foundations of the ’60s folk-rock movement, particularly that which was coming out of Southern California.  During his early years, Dickson produced records by the likes of Hamilton Camp, David Crosby, and the Dillards.  He soon began managing a new band formed by Crosby and Chris Hillman who at first went by the Beefeaters and then the Jet Set.  It was their desire to become Los Angeles’ answer to the Beatles.  In 1964, Dickson was sent a demo of Bob Dylan’s then-unreleased “Mr. Tamborine Man,” which the band, now known as the Byrds, recorded and released.  It would became one of the era’s definitive songs and helped launch a sound that inspired countless other musicians.  To help the band build a following in those early days, Dickson enlisted the help of such famous friends as Jack Nicholson and Albert Grossman to champion them. After Dickson split with the group in 1967, he went on to manage and produce the Flying Burrito Brothers which included Hillman,  Michael Clarke, and Gram Parsons.  He later worked with Parsons on his solo albums as well as Gene Clark and eventually retired to Hawaii where he became a competitive sailor.  Jim Dickson was 80 when he passed away on April 19, 2011.

Thanks to Scott Miller for the assist.



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Died On This Date (January 26, 2011) Charlie Louvin / Country Music Icon

Posted by themusicsover on January 26, 2011

Charlie Louvin (Born Charles Loudermilk)
July 7, 1927 – January 26, 2011

Charlie Louvin was a longtime country singer and songwriter who became a national treasure singing alongside his brother Ira Louvin as the Louvin Brothers.  From 1940 to 1963, the Louvin Brothers created a catalog of country and folk music that ushered in the use of close harmonies to the genres and would be a direct influence on the likes of the Byrds, the Everly Brothers, Emmylou Harris, Gram Parsons, Alison Krauss, and  the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band.  Starting out as a Gospel group, the Louvin Brothers soon began singing secular songs so they could reach a larger audience.  That lead to appearances at the Grand Ole Opry and several charting singles.  The duo disbanded in 1963 and then in 1965, Ira was tragically killed in a car accident, so Charlie forged on as a solo artist.  In recent years, Louvin’s career experienced a renaissance thanks to recognition from the likes of Jeff Tweedy of Wilco, Elvis Costello, and Bright Eyes to name just a few.  Outside of tributes, his songs have been recorded by Uncle Tupelo, Roy Orbison, Willie Nelson, Wanda Jackson, Tammy Wynette, Hank Williams Jr., Doc Watson, and many many more. In 2003, a Grammy winning tribute to the Louvin Brothers entitled Livin’, Lovin’, Losin’: Songs Of The Louvin Brothers was released.  It included performances by Vince Gill, Dierks Bentley, Dolly Parton, Marty Stuart, and Merle Haggard, to name a few.  Louvin continued to release critically acclaimed albums and enjoy the spotlight as recently as 2010.  His final three, including 2010’s The Battle Rages On are considered three of his best.   Charlie Louvin was 83 when he died as a result of pancreatic cancer on January 26, 2011.

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The Battles Rage On - Charlie Louvin

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