The Music's Over

but the songs live on forever

  • Archives

  • Categories

  • Subscribe

  • Join 303 other subscribers

  • Follow And Like

  • Meta

Posts Tagged ‘Fats Domino’

Died On This Date (September 6, 2012) Wardell Quezergue / New Orleans R&B Legend

Posted by themusicsover on September 6, 2011

Wardell Quezergue
March 12, 1930 – September 6, 2011

Photo by Chris Granger

Wardell Quezergue was without a doubt one of the most important figures in New Orleans R&B for the better part of the last 60 years. It was during the ’40s that Quezergue began making his mark on the music world as a member of Dave Bartholomew’s band.  After a stint in the Army band in Korea, he settled back in New Orleans where he formed his own group and label, and began arranging pieces for the likes of Fats Domino and Professor Longhair.  As Quezergue’s reputation as an arranger and producer grew, so did the list of artists who wanted to employ his services.  Over the year’s that list grew to include the likes of the Dixie Cups (“Iko Iko”), Jean Knight (“Mr. Big Stuff”), Aaron Neville, Paul Simon, the Spinners, Willie Nelson, B.B. King, and Dr. John for whom he produced and arranged the Grammy-winning Goin’ Back To New Orleans.  Sadly, Quezergue lost most of his possessions to Hurricane Katrina in 2005, but a fund-raiser by many leading musicians helped him get back on his feet.   Wardell Quezergue was 81 when he died of congestive heart failure on September 6, 2011.

Thanks to Harold Lepidus of the Bob Dylan Examiner for the assist.

What You Should Own

Click to find at amazon.com

Wardell Quezergue

Posted in Arranger, Jazz, Musician, Producer, R&B | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Died On This Date (September 6, 2012) Wardell Quezergue / New Orleans R&B Legend

Died On This Date (April 9, 2011) Randy Wood / Founder Of Dot Records & Ranwood Records

Posted by themusicsover on April 9, 2011

Randy Wood
March 30, 1917 – April 9, 2011

Randy Wood was a successful music industry executive who is perhaps best remembered for being the man behind Dot Records.  Wood had just returned home after serving in World War II when he opened an appliance store in Gallatin, TN.  When he started music – mostly pop and classical albums – young customers began coming in, but asking for the rhythm & blues records they heard on a powerful station from faraway Nashville, Tennessee.  Wood quickly realized there was a need for a mail-order record business, and 78RPM was born.   By sponsoring a show on that Nashville station, WLAC-AM, spots for Randy’s Record Shop’s mail-order services could be heard clear across the United States and beyond.   With the income he was realizing from orders, Wood soon launched Dot Records out of the store.   The label quickly turned a profit as Wood figured out that white performers singing watered-down R&B songs was a recipe for success.   His artists like Pat Boone were turning songs by Little Richard and Fats Domino into pop hits while helping to further popularize the R&B singers as well.  Others he signed to Dot included Lawrence Welk, Tab Hunter, Debbie Reynolds, and the Mills Brothers.  The label was one of the most successful independent record companies of its time.  In 1968, Wood partnered with Welk to launch Ranwood Records in order to release records by artists mostly associated with the Lawrence Welk Show.  Welk purchased the label from Wood in 1979.  Randy Wood passed away on April 9, 2011.  He was 94.



>

Posted in Radio, Record Label | Tagged: , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Died On This Date (July 30, 2010) Richard “Scar” Lopez / Cannibal & The Headhunters

Posted by themusicsover on July 30, 2010

Richard “Scar” Lopez
May 18, 1945 – July 30, 2010

Richard Lopez at bottom

Richard “Scar” Lopez was an original member of Cannibal & The Headhunters, a group of singers from East Los Angeles who are considered to the first Mexican American group to have a national hit record with “Land Of A Thousand Dances.” The odds of making a record that would become one of the most famous songs in rock history have got to be at least a million to one. And even less likely, is to find yourself sharing the bill with the Beatles on their legendary 1965 US tour. Cannibal & the Headhunters did just that.  Lopez was just a high school kid living in East L.A. when he and brothers, Joe “Yo Yo” Jaramillo and Bobby “Rabbit” Jaramillo discovered they could create a special harmony when singing together. Within a short time, they teamed up with another local singer by the name of Frankie “Cannibal” Garcia to form the group that would soon be called Cannibal & The Headhunters, with Garcia as front man. After passing an audition for local record executive Eddie Davis, Cannibal & The Headhunters signed to his Rampart Records. They were soon in the studio recording “Land Of A Thousand Dances,” a song co-written by Fats Domino which was already a local hit by another artist. But it was their version of the song that shot to Billboard’s top 30 in April of 1965, and they were fast becoming the pride of East L.A. Before long, the group found themselves on the road sharing the stage with such superstars as the Temptations, Smokey Robinson, Ben E. King, Marvin Gaye, Wilson Pickett and Tom Jones. They were also invited to perform on “Hullabaloo,” a national rock ‘n roll variety show that counted Paul McCartney as one of its fans. The story goes that McCartney saw the boys on “Hullabaloo” and requested that manager Brian Epstein bring them on tour with the Beatles.   The group was soon flying around the country playing before tens of thousands of screaming Beatles fans at each stop. That tour included the Beatles’ legendary Shea Stadium and Hollywood Bowl shows. Legend has it that the Headhunters were exciting the crowds so much, that Epstein asked their manager to have them ease up a bit on stage. Back home after the tour, the guys started to make more records, but were never able to recapture the hysteria that sparked from that first huge hit. By 1967, Cannibal & The Headhunters had broken up and Lopez went on to become a landscaper, but the group occasionally reunited for special events.  Richard “Scar” Lopez was 65 when he died of lung cancer on July 30, 2010.

What You Should Own

Click to find at amazon.com

Cannibal and the Headhunters

Posted in Early Rock, Singer | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Died On This Date (July 30, 2010) Richard “Scar” Lopez / Cannibal & The Headhunters

Died On This Date (May 24, 2000) Joe “Yo Yo” Jaramillo / Cannibal & The Headhunters

Posted by themusicsover on May 24, 2010

Joe “Yo Yo” Jaramillo
October 15, 1948 – March 24, 2000

Photo courtesy of Joe Jaramillo Jr.

Joe Jaramillo was an original member of Cannibal & The Headhunters, a group of singers from East Los Angeles who are considered to the first Mexican American group to have a national hit record with “Land Of A Thousand Dances.” The odds of making a record that would become one of the most famous songs in rock history have got to be at least a million to one. And even less likely, is to find yourself sharing the bill with the Beatles on their legendary 1965 US tour. Joe Jaramillo did just that. He was just a 15-year-old kid living in a notorious Los Angeles housing project when “Yo Yo,” his brother Bobby “Rabbit” Jaramillo, and friend Richard “Scar” Lopez discovered they could create a special harmony when singing together. Within a short time, they teamed up with another local singer by the name of Frankie “Cannibal” Garcia to form the group that would soon be called Cannibal & The Headhunters, with Garcia as front man. After passing an audition for local record executive Eddie Davis, Cannibal & The Headhunters signed to his Rampart Records. They were soon in the studio recording “Land Of A Thousand Dances,” a song co-written by Fats Domino which was already a local hit by another artist. But it was their version of the song that shot to Billboard’s top 30 in April of 1965, and they were fast becoming the pride of East LA. Before long, the group found themselves on the road sharing the stage with such superstars as the Temptations, Smokey Robinson, Ben E. King, Marvin Gaye, Wilson Pickett and Tom Jones. They were also invited to perform on “Hullabaloo,” a national rock ‘n roll variety show that counted Paul McCartney as one of its fans. The story goes that McCartney saw the boys on “Hullabaloo” and requested that manager Brian Epstein bring them on tour with the Beatles. Jaramillo and the group were soon flying around the country playing before tens of thousands of screaming Beatles fans at each stop. That tour included the Beatles’ legendary Shea Stadium and Hollywood Bowl shows. Legend has it that the Headhunters were exciting the crowds so much, that Epstein asked their manager to have them ease up a bit on stage. Back home after the tour, the guys started to make more records, but were never able to recapture the hysteria that sparked from that first huge hit. By 1967, the group had broken up, with the guys going their separate ways only to reunite on rare occasions. For “Yo Yo” that meant raising a family. Joe Jaramillo passed away as a result of liver disease on May 24, 2000 at the age of 52.

What You Should Own

Cannibal and the Headhunters

Posted in Early Rock, R&B, Singer | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

Died On This Date (March 23, 2010) Marva Wright / New Orleans Blues & Gospel Great

Posted by themusicsover on March 23, 2010

Marva Wright
March 20, 1948 – March 23, 2010

Marva Wright was a popular New Orleans blues and Gospel singer who has rightfully been called the Blues Queen of New Orleans.  Whether performing in area clubs or in front of thousands at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival, Wright was a familiar and welcomed site throughout the city for many years.  She was a popular concert draw throughout Europe and beyond as well.  Even though she began singing at the age of nine, Wright didn’t make it a career until she hit her 40s, and since then she has released several critically and fan acclaimed albums and even performed at the White House.  Over the course of her career, she has performed with the likes of Joe Cocker, Glen Campbell, Fats Domino, and Lou Rawls, to name a few.   Marva Wright was 62 when she died on March 23, 2010 of complications of a stroke she suffered the previous year.

What You Should Own

Click to find at amazon.com

Bluesiana Mama - Marva Wright

Posted in Blues, Gospel, Singer | Tagged: , , , , | Comments Off on Died On This Date (March 23, 2010) Marva Wright / New Orleans Blues & Gospel Great