The Music's Over

but the songs live on forever

RIP, Charanjit Singh (July 5, 2015) Influential Indian Musician

Posted by themusicsover on July 5, 2015

Charanjit Singh
1940 – July 5, 2015

charanjit-singhCharanjit Singh was a multi instrumentalist from Mumbai, India, who, during the ’60s, ’70s and ’80s, found his calling playing guitar and synthesizer on numerous Bollywood soundtracks.  In 1982, he released Synthesizing: Ten Ragas to a Disco Beat to little fanfare.  But when it was reissued in 2010, it was embraced by the acid house community who acknowledged Singh as a pioneer of the genre.  The sound he created clearly had an influence on the likes of Aphex Twin and Ceephax.  Charanjit Singh was 75 when he died in his sleep on July 5, 2015.

What You Should Own

Click to find at amazon.com

Click to find at amazon.com


Posted in Electronic, Musician | Tagged: , , | Leave a Comment »

RIP, Chris Squire (June 28, 2015) Co-Founder Of Yes

Posted by themusicsover on June 28, 2015

Chris Squire
March 4, 1948 – June 28, 2015

Photo by David Plastik - Click To Order Quality Prints - Discount code: 10OFF

Photo by David Plastik – Click To Order Quality Prints – Discount code: 10OFF

Chris Squire was a singer, songwriter, and co-founding bassist of the influential British progressive rock band, Yes. And to many, he was one of rock’s greatest bass players of all time. Born in a London suburb, Squire began his musical training as part of his church choir.  Like so many teens in 1964, Squire heard the Beatles and knew that was what he wanted to do, so he picked up the bass and began learning how to use it.  After perfecting his craft playing in a few bands around town for a couple of years, Squire was introduced to Jon Anderson. During the summer of 1968, and after recruiting Peter Banks, Bill Bruford, and Tony Kaye, Yes was born.  Over the next four decades, the band went through several personnel changes and a couple of breaks, with Squire remaining the one and only constant throughout.  They released twenty studio albums with nine reaching the Top 10 in either the US or UK and sold over 13 million in the US alone.  Along the way they not only helped create the blueprint for prog rock, but helped refine it along the way.  They were also very instrumental in expanding its fan base into the mainstream.  In May of 2015, it was announced that Squire was suffering from and acute form of leukemia. Less than six weeks later, on June 28, 2015, Chris Squire died from it at the age of 67.

Thanks to David Plastik at eRock Photos for the assist.

What You Should Own

Click to find at amazon.com

Click to find at amazon.com


Posted in Musician, Rock, Singer, Songwriter | Tagged: , , , , , | 3 Comments »

RIP, Wendell Holmes (June 19, 2015) The Holmes Brothers

Posted by themusicsover on June 19, 2015

Wendell Holmes
December 19, 1943 – June 19, 2015

wendell-holmesWendell Holmes was the guitarist, pianist and vocalist for the legendary gospel, R&B, and blues band, the Holmes Brothers. Formed in 1978, the trio built a legion of loyal followers thanks to their heavenly harmonies and overall sound that was once described by the New York Times as “deeply soulful, uplifting and timeless.”   Formed in Christchurch, Virginia, the Holmes Brothers moved to Harlem during the ’80s to try their luck in the city’s blues clubs.  They signed their first record deal in 1989 and went on to release 12 albums, including three that landed in the top five of the Billboard Blues Album charts.   The list of artists they recorded with includes Joan Osborne, Willie Nelson, Peter Gabriel, and Van Morrison.  In 2014, they received an National Endowment For The Arts National Heritage Fellowship.  Wendell Holmes died from complications due to pulmonary hypertension.  He was 71.

What You Should Own

Click to find at amazon.com

Click to find at amazon.com


Posted in Blues, Musician, R&B, Singer, Songwriter | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

RIP, Ornette Coleman (June 11, 2015) Jazz Great

Posted by themusicsover on June 11, 2015

Randolph Ornette Coleman
March 9, 1930 – June 11, 2015

Photo by Jimmy Katz

Photo by Jimmy Katz

Ornette Coleman was one of the true greats of jazz.  As a saxophonist, he pioneered what would become to be called “free jazz.” In fact, he is often credited with actually inventing it, or at least putting a name to it, after naming his 1960 album,  Free Jazz: A Collective Improvisation. Born in Forth Worth, TX., Coleman spent much of his early career traveling around the United States performing along regional jazz circuits.  Along the way he began to incorporate country blues and R&B into his sound.  In his slower pieces, his high timbre can come across as crying, which appealed to fans of the blues as well.  In 1959, while living in New York, Coleman released The Shape of Things To Come, and a year later, Free Jazz.  Both releases broke him through in a big way and laid the foundation for the avant-garde movement of the 1960s and beyond.   In later years Coleman dabbled in rock, even performing with the Grateful Dead on occasion.  In 2007, he became the first musician to win a Pulitzer Prize – for his album, Sound Grammar.  He continued to perform and record up until the time of his death.  Ornette Coleman was 85 when he died of cardiac arrest on June 11, 2015.

Thanks to Harold Lepidus of the Bob Dylan Examiner for the assist.

What You Should Own

Click to find at amazon.com

Click to find at amazon.com


Posted in Jazz, Musician | Tagged: , | Leave a Comment »

RIP, Ronnie Gilbert (June 6, 2015) Folk Music Great; The Weavers

Posted by themusicsover on June 6, 2015

Ronnie Gilbert
September 7, 1926 – June 6, 2015

ronnie-gilbertSimply put, Ronnie Gilbert was folk music royalty.  Along with Pete Seeger, Lee Hays, and Fred Hellerman, Gilbert formed the Weavers in 1948.  Based in the folk mecca of New York’s Greenwich Village, the band was arguably the most influential folk group the scene had ever produced.  Artists and activists like Joan Baez, Bob DylanMimi & Richard Farina, and Peter, Paul & Mary were all products of the folk revival they kicked off by putting a contemporary spin on folk music.  The band gained popularity, mostly by word of mouth, while their songs resonated with so-called progressive causes like civil rights and workers’ rights.  Their recordings of “If I Had a Hammer,” “This Land is Your Land,” and “Goodnight Irene” – among many others – became folk music standards.  During the 1950s, the Weavers became a victim of the “Red Scare,” causing them to become blacklisted from radio stations, television and beyond.  Due to a lack of bookings and recording opportunities that followed, the band broke up.  But in 1955, they reunited for a much-heralded performance at Carnegie Hall, which lead to renewed interest in their music.  The group continued on, though with Erik Darling replacing Seeger, over the next decade before calling it quits again.  Gilbert went on to enjoy a career in theater as well as as a solo recording artist.  In 1980, the surviving Weavers reunited once again to a sold-out crowd at Carnegie Hall.  Ronnie Gilbert was 88 when she passed away on June 6, 2015

What You Should Own

Click to find at amazon.com

Click to find at amazon.com


Posted in Folk, Singer | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »